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Prioritizing Heart Health: Celebrating Black History Month and Valentine's Day



February brings about two important occasions: Black History Month and Valentine's Day. With all the focus on celebrating black excellence and showing love to others, it's easy to forget about taking care of one of the most important organs in our bodies - the heart. As African Americans, it's especially crucial to prioritize heart health, as statistics show that we are at a higher risk for heart disease.


According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death for African Americans, with higher rates of hypertension and diabetes contributing to the increased risk. In fact, African Americans are 30% more likely to die from heart disease than white Americans. It's important to take these statistics seriously and make conscious efforts to show our hearts some love.


One way to prioritize heart health is through exercise. Regular physical activity can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, both of which contribute to heart disease. This can be as simple as taking a brisk walk for 30 minutes a day, or finding an exercise routine that works for you.


Another way to show your heart some love is through a heart-healthy diet. This means incorporating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins into your meals, while limiting processed and high-fat foods. It's also important to watch your sodium intake, as too much salt can raise blood pressure.


Lastly, taking care of your mental health can also contribute to heart health. Stress and anxiety can have negative effects on the heart, so finding ways to manage stress, such as through meditation or therapy, can be beneficial.


As we celebrate Black History Month and Valentine's Day, let's not forget to show our hearts some love. By prioritizing heart health through exercise, a heart-healthy diet, and managing stress, we can reduce our risk of heart disease and live longer, healthier lives.



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